Maker Faire Kathmandu

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I just returned from Kathmandu after a great weekend presenting our Hive Sense project. If you don’t know about Hive Sense it is a project we started under Random Hacks of Kindness (RHoK) Ottawa to help Algonquin College monitor some bee hives. The goal is better understand bee behaviour and find out why bees are dying while teaching students about where food comes from and our impact on our food chain. We are in the process of helping get relocated hives under monitoring and will provide a link to this data in the coming months.

Our hope is to help better educate people on the importance to bees and the fact that without them we would not have any fruits or vegetables. Bees are responsible for one out of every three bites of food we consume and are an agricultural commodity that’s been valued at $15 billion annually in the U.S. alone. They are a major unpaid workforce with a huge work ethic — bees from one hive can collect pollen from up to 100,000 flowering plants in a single day and pollinate many of them while doing so. They are a critical part of our food chain and they are dying but most people appear to be not alarmed by this — but they should be! If the bees are dying from pesticide exposure or other environmental factors what impact is it having on us and our children? Cancer, DNA mutations, who knows? We need to collect the data to better understand the problem.

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These are important questions that need to get answered but I am not a research scientist. I am technologist that can build solutions and so we are doing our part to help in both bee and agriculture research. Oh, did I mention this is an IoT solution.

As for the Maker Faire Kathmandu, it was great to see so many people out. While it rained buckets the first day and our booth got flooded – funny now but the thought of having my Mac book destroyed from a power surge was a bit overwhelming at the time. That said the interest in bees and bee life was awesome. It was also great to have my placard (see above photo) signed by so many people.

I hope to return some day to Nepal. The people are very friendly and love talking to you. I love all the temples around the city and was able to get a bird’s eye view of Mount Everest in all its towering majesty. (see below)

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About F Khan

Tech-junkie, with a special affection for security issues as they relate to telecom and enterprise, mobile, standards, social media, and gadgets.