Connecting the Dots for SMBs & Cybersecurity

Does your company’s private network speed ever feel like a VPN? Did someone (other than your IT director) reset your password? Have you been reading emails from the Nigerian Prince? If you’ve answered yes, it’s possible your company has fallen victim to a cyber attack.

If you’re a multinational tech giant, you’re probably fine (probably). But if you’re a SMB, cyber attacks can destroy priceless data and ravage your bottom line.

Let’s take a look at some stats: it takes most businesses somewhere between 100 and 200 days to detect an attack and to make matters worse, most SMBs find out from a third party. That means stolen data (that’s likely long gone forever) and damaged customer relationships. In addition, SMBs only have a 40 percent probability of staying in business after a security breach which are odds Han Solo wouldn’t even take.

These days, whether you sell Apple phones or apple pies your company has an attack surface. An attack surface can be anything from the Internet, to technology, to an employee and no matter how big your company may be, you need to be prepared.

You have been compromised. Now what?

In the event that your network has been attacked, react urgently but do not panic. Instead, have a plan in place. Ideally you have developed your plan before the attack, but often that is not the case.

In 2016, more than 375 million new unique malware variants were discovered globally. Cyber criminals are continuously finding new ways to breach security systems, so make sure your plan is malleable. After a cyber attack, here is the recommended plan of action:

  1. Identify the target systems and determine the data that was compromised, hopefully you had a backup of your data to be able to restore. Now perform a full system backup at the bit level to capture all files and current system state. If possible, disconnect from your network but leave the power on to preserve the system state.
  2. Take your cloned systems disks and use them for forensics in a protected environment or hand them over to your cyber security partner for analysis.
  3. Have your operating system rebuilt from scratch. At this point, you have no idea whether or not a back door has been installed. Assume that it has.

In a cyber attack, there is both a technical and human component to its path of destruction. While you work to get the technical side under control, contact your legal team and make them aware of the situation.

Start dusting off that PR handbook.

Public relations is something often neglected by SMBs. It’s important to notify your PR team as soon as possible after an attack. If you don’t have one, get one. Whether that means hiring one full time or on contract is entirely up to you.

In any business, do not try to downplay the situation. Equifax learned this the hard way when they chalked up their massive breach to “Criminals exploited a U.S. website application vulnerability to gain access to certain files.” In a blizzard of negative publicity, the story snowballed with the breach ultimately costing them close to $70 million in fourth quarter profits. Given time, the company’s hit to brand credibility will indicate its true losses.

Another PR mistake is deflecting liability. Many company executives have taken a stroll down ‘Blame Game Lane’, which almost always leaves them on the wrong side of the tracks. In 2016, Wells Fargo was fined $185 million for creating two million fake customer accounts and their CEO immediately took to blaming his 5,300 employees. By not admitting fault, one of the largest banks in the world put its internal and external reputation in serious jeopardy.

“The greatest victory is the one that requires no battle.” – Sun Tzu, The Art of War

While larger companies typically survive, it’s no wonder SMBs go out of business so fast. Cyber attacks cost time and money, both of which SMBs can’t afford to lose. Many still fail to evaluate their cyber security risks, however, boardrooms are smartening up. It’s even been a topic in NAFTA discussions. Develop a security protocol and be proactive in testing and quantifying your risks. Businesses of all sizes should test their systems and perform ‘war games’ to prepare for an attempted breach.

Put simply, two words can save your business from a cyber attack: be proactive. The most common means of cyber incursion is social engineering – using people to voluntarily but unknowingly allow a cyber attack to occur such as providing physical access or handing over system passwords. Train your employees, learn to recognize the signs of a breach and avoid opening emails from unknown sources.

Cybersecurity is unfamiliar territory for most companies these days, but one worth exploring. As you continue to evaluate your company’s security controls, just know we can help you connect the dots.

Written by: DarkKnight

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedin

About F Khan

Tech-junkie, with a special affection for security issues as they relate to telecom and enterprise, mobile, standards, social media, and gadgets.